LOST and Found

I’m a little late to the party, probably, but here’s my two cents concerning the grand finale of LOST.  So much has been said and written concerning this momentous television event, that whatever I offer here is really just fluff, but still I have some thoughts on it.

First of all, what other people said about it almost superceded the actual episode.  It’s impossible to gauge just how important this has been to so many people, and the sheer quantity of theories about the meaning of it all.  The story itself has been so compelling, and so full of questions, that to try and make it completely clear in the last two hours, or two weeks or even months, seems highly unlikely.

I have questions that will remain unanswered.  Why didn’t no name/black cloud/Locke  have a name?  Do you mean to say that all of the years, including childhood, he went nameless.  And, if the original “others” were all killed, then where did the other others come from?  Unless I missed an episode or two on that subject, it remains a question.

Those two are just silly compared to the bigger question that I have.  When did everyone else die?  I know Jack died, because we watched him close his eyes in that very moving scene, content to know that the rest of his group were flying away in the Oceanic plane.  So, did they crash?  Or, is it because, as Christian Shepherd stated, there isn’t any time element in death, so everyone is there whether they’re actually dead or not.  That’s one that still has me scratching my head.  I mean, I get the whole concept of an “eternal now”.  It’s the same one that encompasses the nature of God…an ever present NOW.  But, how can you be the one who is dead and still have people there with you who aren’t dead, even though it’s all NOW, but their NOW still has some life in it?  That is a question, regardless of the length of the sentence.  The confusion inherent in it’s content is real.

One of the things I was clinging to in this last season was the shot of a tattoo on Charlie’s arm, from the first season.  It’s a quote from Strawberry Fields (thank you Lennon and McCartney): Living is easy with eyes closed, misunderstanding all you see.  That is such a brilliant line, and it seemed to be the essence of LOST…nothing is real, nothing is what you think it is or see.  Maybe they did play on that, since people were obviously dead when we thought they were alive, but I still don’t know when  they died, except for the obvious ones who had actual death scenes.

Is anyone else out there struggling with this?  I’ve read the blogs, entertained theories from other writers, but it’s not all gelling for me.  For instance, one fellow wrote that he was disappointed that it all took such a Judeo/Christian stance in the ending.  Whoa!  I don’t get that at all, except for the fact they were in what looked like a church.  Karma seemed to be a bigger theme than redemption, although the latter is in there to some degree.  But, it’s not the same type of redemption that marks Christianity, rather the type that fits into reincarnation: making it work so you don’t have to do it all over again.  Being set free from the cycle of rebirth, rather than a regenerative rebirth was more the message I was getting.

So, is that what was happening when they went back to the island, do you suppose?  Jack needed to make it all better, which he thought could be facilitated by nuking the island.  That didn’t work, so were they dead then?  Did they get another chance?  And, the alternate storyline that we were watching was…what?  Not reality, not another universe (or multiverse, for the quantum folk), it was just a place to reignite their recognition of what had been…?  Am I getting close?

Well, this was a great series.  I loved watching it, being confused by it and trying to figure it all out with clues and blogs and websites…all of it.  But, I still don’t know exactly what happened in that final episode and I welcome illumination.  And, I want to know who was actually dead.

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